Send HTML Emails That Work: 3 Things To Avoid

When it comes to email marketing, everyone knows that the devil is in the details. But did you know that sloppy HTML code can get your email dumped into the spam file? That's why we've put together this list of things you'll need to know when you send HTML emails. Keep reading for more info:

Avoid sloppy HTML and other code in your layouts

If you're using your own HMTL layout for your email campaigns, you'll need to do a sweep and get rid of all the little things that can lampoon your campaigns. This include sloppy HTML code, junk code left over from Microsoft Word and other programs, and open tags. What you need to do before you send your campaigns is preview what your email layout will look like in the inboxes of major email providers. Send yourself a test campaign and any leftover sloppy code will show up in the form of design errors. If you usually work in Microsoft Word to create your email copy, then want to flow it right into your layouts, we recommend that you either create your email marketing text in NotePad , or save your work in text-only format in Word or no-frills word processing software.

Don't send an HTML email without a text one as well

A few years ago, a study showed that the amount of people who had their email set to receive text-only emails was extremely small – less than 2%. However, that number has kicked up considerably recently, thanks to the proliferation of smart phones, PDAs and other devices. Take note that oddly enough, some email service providers will block an HTML email if there is no text counterpart to accompany it. For this reason alone, make sure you create a text-only counterpart to all your HTML email campaigns.

Avoid sending image-only emails

Sending an image-only email may seem like a cute idea, especially if you're an expert in viral marketing. However, image-only emails tend to set off spam filters, regardless of where they link to or who sends them. The reason being is this: email service providers use text, ultimately, to figure out what's inside the emails that arrive. If you have an HTML email that merely contains and image or just a tiny amount of text, the email service provider, in a quest to save time and show caution, will either see that email as empty or send it right to the trash file. When you send HTML emails use your text to show that you're a legitimate operation, and save the image-only emails for people who simply don't care about their reputation.

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