These days it doesn’t seem to be enough to have a company culture. Your company has to have a story. Pair that with a video-friendly culture and you’ve got a href=”www.fstoppers.com/the-best-marketing-dollars-i-have-ever-spent-on-my-business” target=”_blank”>the brilliant collection of videos hosted in an Fstoppers blog post. There, in an article entitled “The Best Marketing Dollars I Have Ever Spent On My Business,” you’ve got a Trevor Dayley advising photography businesses on how they can seal the deal with potential clients. While you may not have a photography or videography business, the exact same rules apply to you.

As some of us probably already know, and as Trevor writes, “the key is helping clients feel comfortable getting to know us on a more personal level. By getting to know us, they will ultimately feel more comfortable in hiring us.” You see, by now your competition already has a great site, equal to or better than yours. They have the marketing down, and they have a great portfolio. So what’s going to nudge you ahead in the race?
You.

You need to feature who you are, because clients ultimately want to know about you as well. Trevor walks to talk and shares his video that features his five kids – and there’s nothing wrong with merging your private life with your professional life. It’s what makes a wonderful well-rounded you. It’s what adds a dimension and creates a connection with clients.

So what exactly do you include in your video? If you look at the beautiful assortment of videos, you get an idea for how splendidly diverse each one is. There’s no mould to fit when it comes to being you. In one example, you’ve got a professional enveloping his wife and kids in the video – showcasing strong family values.

In another, you’ve got a business owner just being full of energy – which some clients will really love and connect with. In another, a woman just rolls through snippets of a fun-filled daily life, whether it’s playing with her daughter, dancing around, working, or cooking dinner for her family. This one was particularly unique because she incorporated a bright daffodil yellow, the color of her brand, into each shot. It was seamless and it was perfect. It resonated with you. It made you want to be part of her life.

And yet in another you’ve got a duo who share their love for the outdoors and each other with part adventurous, part tastefully intimate shots. And finally, and heartily, in yet another you’ve got a professional who mixes in his love for hip hop rapping – though half way through you don’t know if it’s a video of his singing or a promo, but you enjoy watching him love what he’s doing.

In each case an instant connection is made. You feel like you know these people. You’ve gotten a glimpse into their little world, and you want to be a part of it.

Trevor also highlights from tips on how to go about creating your video, include the following:

  • Keep it short and sweet. I think a good range to shoot for is 2-4 minutes.
  • Share your personality in the video.
  • Show yourself working with clients.
  • Use the video to really showcase you. Don’t just make it a slideshow of your favorite photos.
  • Work with your videographer on ideas or a storyboard ahead of the shoot.
  • If you want to showcase more than one client shoot, plan mini-shoots with clients (30 minutes each) and bring a different change of clothes to change into between shoots.
  • Be inspired by other videos, but don’t copy them. Remember this is a time to really show who you are.
  • When possible, choose your music ahead of time with your videographer. Some great sites to license music include a href=”https://www.themusicbed.com/#!/” target=”_blank”>The Music Bed and a href=”https://www.songfreedom.com/” target=”_blank”>SongFreedom.
  • Choose a videographer that has a style you are looking for. Don’t pick someone and then try to mold them into what you want.
  • In addition to putting your video on your website, make it easily accessible on YouTube or Vimeo.

And of course, hire a professional. Not everyone can afford to do this, and I’d have been first to offer short cut tips including DIY-ing it or shooting it yourself then hiring an editor. Yet, after seeing all these gorgeous impression-filled videos, I’d say do it right and hire a professional that has demonstrated skill in exactly what you want. It’s worth every penny.